King Alfred’s Tower – Drone Footage – Somerset – (England)

“King Alfred’s Tower, also known as The Folly of King Alfred the Great or Stourton Tower, is a folly tower. It is in the parish of Brewham in the English county of Somerset, and was built as part of the Stourhead estate and landscape. The tower stands on Kingsettle Hill and belongs to the National Trust. It is designated as a grade I listed building.

Henry Hoare II planned in the 1760s the tower to commemorate the end of the Seven Years’ War against France and the accession of King George III near the location of ‘Egbert’s stone’ where it is believed that Alfred the Great, King of Wessex, rallied the Saxons in May 878 before the important Battle of Edington. It was damaged by a plane in 1944 and restored in the 1980s.

The 49-metre-high (161 ft) triangular tower has a hollow centre and is climbed by means of a spiral staircase in one of the corner projections. It includes a statue of King Alfred and dedication inscription.”

Château de Noisy

Château Miranda (English: Miranda Castle), also known as Château de Noisy (English: Noisy Castle) was a 19th-century neo-Gothic castle in Celles, province of Namur, Belgium, in the region of the Ardennes

The Château was built in 1866 by the English architect Edward Milner under commission from the Liedekerke-De Beaufort family, who had left their previous home, Vêves Castle, during the French Revolution. However, Milner died before the Château was finished. Construction was completed in 1907 after the clock tower was erected.

Their descendants remained in occupation until World War II. A portion of the Battle of the Bulge took place on the property, and it was during that time that the Château was occupied by German forces.

In 1950, Château Miranda was renamed “Château de Noisy” when it was taken over by the National Railway Company of Belgium (NMBS/SNCB) as an orphanage and also a holiday camp for sickly children. It lasted as a children’s camp until the late 1970s.

The Château stood empty and abandoned since 1991 because the costs to maintain it were too great, and a search for investors in the property failed. Although the municipality of Celles had offered to take it over, the family refused, and the enormous building lingered in a derelict state, succumbing to decay and vandalism. Parts of the structure were heavily damaged in a fire and many areas of the ceiling were beginning to collapse. Despite this, it become a favorite venue of urban explorers.

Text: Wiki

October 2017… the château was completely demolished.

Sadly, this is all that remains…